Tag Archive: podcasts.

Song Exploder: The story of "The Commander Thinks Aloud", by The Long Winters

Song Exploder: The story of "The Commander Thinks Aloud", by The Long Winters

From Episode 28 of the Song Exploder podcast - The Commander Thinks Aloud by The Long Winters:

On February 1st, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia broke apart while reentering the earth’s atmosphere. John Roderick, singer and songwriter of The Long Winters, wrote “The Commander Thinks Aloud” about that fateful moment.

Even after listening to numerous Roderick on the Line episodes I hadn't heard of The Long Winters until recently, and I've really enjoyed listening to their back catalogue.

This particular track, though, I came across by accident thanks to the Song Exploder podcast. It's helped, I think, by Roderick's fantastic storytelling, but hearing that almost magical drum track in isolation makes my inner music nerd (no matter how small said nerd is) rather happy.

Just wait for the lump in your throat - was that something in my eye? - when you hear that crew compartment line over and over again.

How I use HuffDuffer as "Instapaper for Audio"

I like to listen to podcasts. There's the big names I listen to such as This American Life, their spinoff Serial, and Radiolab - but I also like listening to ad-hoc pieces of audio that I come across without subscribing to a whole podcast feed.

For a while now I've been doing this with Huffduffer. Huffduffer lets me have my own personal "podcast" feed made of individual audio files. In a way it's like Instapaper (another favourite of mine for collecting articles to read) but for listening.

I use the official Huffduffer Chrome extension. Whenever I come across a page with a link to an MP3 I want to listen to later, I hit the little Huffduffer 'hand' and the details are saved to my Huffduffer feed.

In my Podcast player (I use and like Overcast) I manually subscribe to my feed. It's at https://huffduffer.com/username/rss. Then, whenever I 'Huffduff' some audio, it appears as a podcast episode in Overcast.

A few places I've used this recently:

I've no idea if this is how Huffduffer is intended to be used, but it's bloody useful.

Serial: We're listeners, not detectives

I love listening to Serial, the podcast you've already heard about where This American Life journalist Sarah Koenig revisits the 15-year-old murder case of Hae Min Lee, uncovering details week by week. Today in The Guardian, Jon Ronson, published an exclusive interview with the family of Adnan Syed, the man convicted of Lee's murder.

Serial: The Syed family on their pain and the ‘five million detectives trying to work out if Adnan is a psychopath’*:

Then came the conviction, and the family fell apart. Tanveer vanished to Philadelphia, becoming totally estranged from the family. “Imagine having a family one day, and the next day you wake up and it’s completely broken,” Yusuf says. “It’s all gone.”

And then came the Serial podcast. And suddenly people have started running up to the family with tears in their eyes.

People listening to the podcast are trying to crack the case themselves.

This article (both the article and the behaviour it talks about) make me uncomfortable. We must take Serial as the entertainment that it is. Koenig is doing a spectacular job of telling the story to us, the listener, but we need to remember that our job is as listeners. We're listening to Koenig's perspective on this story (albeit a very thoroughly researched perspective), and we have never been invited to get involved and start doing our own interviews with the people close to the crime.

When the general public or the press start contacting the family of Lee, a murder victim, or the Syed family (reminder: Adnan Syed is still a convicted murderer, no matter your opinion based on Serial), a line has been crossed. These families have been trying to rebuild their lives for the past decade and a half, and having every news outlet and amateur sleuth on the internet knocking on their door is not going to help their personal circumstances.

“I haven’t told Sarah this,” Yusuf [Syed] says, “but we feel Serial has brought us all back together. My older brother Tanveer – who was estranged for 15 years – he came home. When he heard my brother’s voice, it brought back all the memories. He’s visited us three or four times already.”

Hidden towards the end of Ronson's article in The Guardian, this snippet gave me a glimmer of hope that Serial isn't entirely bad for those close to the horrific events of 1999. However this is only one family; based on a verified posting on Reddit, Hae Min Lee's family aren't so happy with their new-found fame - and I'm sure the public sympathy towards the man convicted of their daughters' murder doesn't help.

If Syed is innocent, or if the podcast raises enough doubt in the minds of the US justice system that a retrial or appeal occurs, then it's pretty easy to justify the additional press coverage of these families... and I'd hope that nobody would begrudge a retrial, if there was sufficient evidence that Syed might be innocent.

Until then, the friends and family of Hae Min Lee and Adnan Syed need to be left alone. Enjoy the show, but don't do further harm to those who have already suffered enough.

New Podcast: Django Roundup

Lincoln Loop are one of the earlier Django-based development shops, and their various employees contribute in many ways to the open-source community. One new addition they've just made is the launch of Django Round-Up, a podcast covering the news in the Django community.

This is a podcast hosted by @kennethlove and @bkonkle from @lincolnloop that highlights recent articles and projects in the Django community. We love talking about web development, so our podcast focuses on casual conversations as we cover the latest blog posts and project releases.

I was surprised to hear my name coming through my headphones, only a minute into their first episode - with a quick review of my recently-published django-readonly-site package.

As a result of their comments I've made some minor updates to address questions and suggestions from the podcast team.

I want to publicly thank them for including my item in their inaugural episode, and suggest that anybody in the Django community goes out and checks out this valuable new resource!

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